• 831(b) captives draw scrutiny from IRS and Congress

    Large companies have been forming captive insurance companies (captives) to self-insure their risks since the 1950’s. In general, these captives were formed to lower insurance costs, provide access to the reinsurance market, and cover exposures where there are gaps in the commercial market. When congress enacted section 831(b) of the Internal Revenue code in 1986, it was intended to extend the benefits of self-insurance, from large publicly traded companies to smaller middle market closely held business entities.
  • Internal audit value optimization for insurance organizations

    The demands on the internal audit departments of insurance organizations have increased significantly in recent years as technology advances, regulation becomes more rigorous, new risks emerge, and companies seek more business insights. Internal audit plays a crucial role in providing assurance on an organization’s governance, risk management, and control processes to help achieve strategic, operational, and financial objectives while balancing compliance objectives and expectations from regulators. Internal audit departments need to leverage an understanding of insurance industry trends, feedback from leadership, and available public information to add value to the organization – to optimize internal audit value.
  • SSAP No. 101 continues to create uncertainty for insurance companies

    Three years after implementation, the complex nature of Statement of Statutory Accounting Principles (SSAP) No. 101, Income Taxes, A Replacement of SSAP No. 10R and SSAP No. 10, continues to bring doubt and uncertainty to insurance companies, especially those without internal tax departments.