• Regulatory noncompliance is now a financial matter

    More punitive regulatory approach raises financial statement audit scrutiny: In the aftermath of the Great Recession, regulators have turned dramatically to a far more punitive approach in dealing with actual and alleged instances of noncompliance with laws and regulations by financial institutions. The increased presence of significant financial consequences, brings into greater light a financial statement auditing standard that previously had infrequent application and limited effect on the financial condition and results of reporting companies’ operations.
  • OCC: You can’t outsource responsibility

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) recently updated its risk-management guidelines for third-party relationships, and the new guidelines give banks more responsibility than ever. According to the new guidelines, financial institutions have many of the same responsibilities for managing risk from vendors as they do from their own operations.
  • Cybersecurity: Stay ahead of an evolving landscape

    While safeguarding information assets is not a new business objective, cybersecurity has emerged as an area of critical concern for executives and boards of directors. As organizations’ key business operations have become more technology-reliant, they also have become more vulnerable to a cyber-attack.
  • Going Concern: FASB issues new standard on reporting adverse conditions and events

    FASB has released a new accounting standard that provides much-needed guidance on management’s responsibility in evaluating and disclosing adverse conditions or events that raise substantial doubt about a company’s ability to continue as a “going concern.” The guidance, published in ASU 2014-15, Presentation of Financial Statements — Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40): Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern, applies to all companies that prepare their financial statements in accordance with US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). This article details the new guidance.